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The Alzheimer’s Reading Room Knowledge Base | Alzheimer’s Reading Room

See on Scoop.itBob DeMarco

The Alzheimer’s Reading Room Knowledge Base contains more than 4,000 articles. In the ARR we offer “real life” solutions to problems that Alzheimer’s caregivers and their families encounter each day.

Bob DeMarco‘s insight:

The Alzheimer’s Reading Room is the number one source of Alzheimers care and information on dementia care, health, memory loss, and treatment for the entire Alzheimer’s and Dementia community worldwide. The goal of the Alzheimer’s Reading Room is to Educate and Empower.

http://bit.ly/GNDu8y

See on www.alzheimersreadingroom.com

 
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Posted by on October 26, 2013 in alzheimer's

 

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What is the Difference Between Alzheimer’s and Dementia?

*What is the Difference Between Alzheimer’s and Dementia?*

This is the most frequently asked question on the Alzheimer’s Reading Room

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See it — http://www.alzheimersreadingroom.com/2010/06/whats-difference-between-alzheimers-and.html

 
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Posted by on October 24, 2013 in alzheimer's

 

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Walking Problems For Seniors

Balance and walking problems often present before the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s or dementia.

See @ http://www.alzheimersreadingroom.com/2010/04/problems-with-balance-walking-and.html

 
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Posted by on October 24, 2013 in alzheimer's

 

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What is Alzheimer’s Disease? What are the Eight Types of Dementia?

Alzheimer’s disease is a physical illness that causes radical changes in the brain. As healthy brain tissues degenerate persons suffering from Alzheimer’s experience a steady decline in memory and the ability to use their brain to perform tasks.

 

What is Alzheimer's Disease? What are the Eight Types of Dementia?

What’s the Difference Between Alzheimer’s and Dementia?

In a nutshell, dementia is a symptom, and Alzheimer’s disease is the cause of the symptom. When someone is told they have dementia, it means that they have significant memory problems as well as other cognitive difficulties, and that these problems are severe enough to get in the way of daily living.

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What is Alzheimer’s Disease?
Alzheimer’s disease is a physical illness that causes radical changes in the brain. As healthy brain tissues degenerate persons suffering from Alzheimer’s experience a steady decline in memory and the ability to use their brain to perform tasks.

Go here to read more about Alzheimer’s disease.

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What is Dementia?
Dementia is the gradual deterioration of mental functioning, such as concentration, memory, and judgment, which affects a person’s ability to perform normal daily activities.

Go here to read more about Dementia.

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Dementia and the Eight Types of Dementia 
Dementia is a an illness that usually occurs slowly over time, and usually includes a progressive state of deterioration. The earliest signs of dementia are usually memory problems, confusion, and changes in the way a person behaves and communicates.

Go here to read more about the Eight Types of Dementia.

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Is it really Alzheimer’s or something else?
Many people assume that if an older person becomes forgetful and can no longer deal with some of the basic activities of daily living, he or she must have Alzheimer’s disease. This is not always the case.

Go here to read more about Is it really Alzheimer’s or something else?

Original content Bob DeMarco, the Alzheimer’s Reading Room

 
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Posted by on February 25, 2013 in alzheimer's

 

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Affordable Care Act Saves Consumers $1.5 Billion

Consumers saw nearly $1.5 billion in insurer rebates and overhead cost savings in 2011, due to the Affordable Care Act’s medical loss ratio provision requiring health insurers to spend at least 80 percent of premium dollars on health care or quality improvement activities or pay a rebate to their customers, according to a newCommonwealth Fund report.

Consumers with individual policies saw substantially reduced premiums when insurers reduced both administrative costs and profits to meet the new standards. While insurers in the small- and large-group markets achieved lower administrative costs, not all of these savings were passed on to employers and consumers, as many insurers increased profits in these markets.

“The medical loss ratio requirements are intended to give insurers an incentive to be more efficient and use most of their premium dollars for patient care,” said Sara Collins, Commonwealth Fund Vice President for Affordable Health Insurance. “This report is encouraging, as it demonstrates that these new rules are improving value for people buying health insurance on their own, which has traditionally been very challenging. However, it will be crucial to monitor insurers’ responses to this regulation over time to ensure that all purchasers and consumers benefit from the savings the law is designed to encourage.”

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Posted by on December 6, 2012 in alzheimer's

 

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