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Category Archives: caregiver resources

See the Signs of Alzheimer’s– Free Guide Available

This free guide is an excellent resource and should be especially interesting to baby boomers. The guide includes: information about Alzheimer’s disease, information about a prescription treatment option, a doctor discussion guide, and caregiving tips.

While you are on the website obtaining this free resource guide you can also select an option that allows a caregiving nurse to call you and discuss Alzheimer’s topics. The nurse can help you identify issues to discuss with your doctor, answer questions about Alzheimer’s, and provide you with important tips and resources in your area.

To obtain this free material go to See The Signs.

You can also visit these interesting areas while you are on the website.

Signs & Symptoms

Symptom Screener

Original content the Alzheimer’s Reading Room

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Alzheimer’s Caregivers

I recently received my copy of Alzheimer’s Caregivers . This free handbook and tip sheet is well worth obtaining. You can get up to three free copies so its also easy to share. Get your free copy.

If you obtain the handbook, please let me know your reaction. Feel free to email this post to your friends and relatives.


The 36-Hour Day: A Family Guide to Caring for People with Alzheimer Disease and Memory Loss in Later Life

 

Alzheimer’s Caregivers

I recently received my copy of Alzheimer’s Caregivers . This free handbook and tip sheet is well worth obtaining. You can get up to three free copies so its also easy to share. Get your free copy.

If you obtain the handbook, please let me know your reaction. Feel free to email this post to your friends and relatives.


The 36-Hour Day: A Family Guide to Caring for People with Alzheimer Disease and Memory Loss in Later Life

 

Playbook for Alzheimer’s Caregivers

Follow the link to get your free copy.

clipped from www.alz.org

Tackle the challenges of caregiving with this free football style “playbook” by Frank Broyles, former Athletic Director of the University of Arkansas Razorbacks. The Playbook is an engaging, how-to guide written for those who care for someone with Alzheimer’s. Coach Broyles cared for his late wife Barbara, who had Alzheimer’s disease.

“My wife Betty is in the early stages of Alzheimer’s. The minute I received the ‘Playbook,’ I sat down and read it word for word. What a huge blessing for me to find a straight forward, ‘been there’ account of what lies ahead.
Thank you!”
John Cater
Richmond, Texas

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The Validation Breakthrough: Simple Techniques for Communicating with People with Alzheimer’s Type Dementia

You might get the impression from the title that this book is only for professionals; this is not the case. The validation theory works and it is simple to apply. The case studies are invaluable and provide you with specific situations that you are sure to encounter. I am convinced everyone involved with elderly parents suffering from dementia or Alzheimer’s will benefit from by reading and utilizing this book.

This book contains valuable techniques that are designed to help you communicate more effectively with your loved one. Once perfected you will be able to put away those feelings of frustration and helplessness. Importantly, the learned techniques will help you reduce stress.

I give The Validation Breakthrough five stars and it is on my must read list.

The Validation Breakthrough: Simple Techniques for Communicating with People with Alzheimer’s Type Dementia

Please take a moment to read the reviews on the next page.

Buyer Reviews

By Martine Davis

If you live with or care for someone with Alzheimer’s or other age related dementia, you must read this book ! What an eye-opener! For the first time I finally understood why Alzheimer’s patient say what they say and do what they do. It all makes so much sense now. This small book reads quickly and is full of examples of real people who have been helped with the author’s techniques. It shows you how to handle the blaming, accusing, name-calling and the repetitive motions … It also explains why the way most of us react to Alzheimer’s patients actions actually worsens the situation and can cause them to progress to a more advanced stage of Alzheimer’s disease ! This book could extend the relationship between the patient and caregivers and should be MANDATORY reading for all staff working in nursing homes and long-term care facilities !

By J. Summers, CNA (Alaska)

An excellent book for both the professional caregiver and families trying to deal with this sometimes unfathomable disease. Gives practical ideas and techniques for helping people with dementia deal with issues from paranoia and blaming to sadness and helplessness. I have just begun to explore these techniques and am finding they work so well that they should be mandatory training for nurses, PCAs and CNAs. Instead of treating our seniors like they are children we at last have a way to talk to them on an adult level, tap into where they are at, deal with the problem at hand and we all come out better for the experience.

Reviewer: A reader

More and more relevant as we care for aging parents. With a title like this one might think: “Boring” Absolutely not so! Right from the start, the stories of the people are so real and so touching that one of my friends said she was moved to tears. She was so sad not to have known about this way of relating to her father. “It works,” she told me. “Validation Breakthrough” shows a new way of relating to people with dementia of Alzheimer’s type. This approach is effective in helping the person to clear up unresolved issues in their lives. You do not have to be a professionally trained therapist to use validation. Validation will make the relationship more rewarding for both people. It is not hard to learn and makes wonderful sense. Some readers may want to ask new questions of care facilities (like nursing homes) as the validation approach will keep loved ones from slipping into a vegetative state. It will also make the care much kinder, and more rewarding for the care givers

The Validation Breakthrough: Simple Techniques for Communicating with People with ‘Alzheimer’s-Type Dementia’

 

reminiscence therapy

Memories are powerful–simply reflecting on a precious time with a loved one, a favorite song or a great vacation moment can bring on feelings of happiness, security and relaxation.

there are important therapies that can help make Alzheimer’s disease more manageable for both caregivers and their loved ones, and may improve their ability to retrieve long-lost memories. One of these–reminiscence therapy–involves using personal items such as old photos, home videos and music to rekindle their loved ones’ memories from the past and create a sense of familiarity and safety.

reminiscence therapy has been found to benefit those with Alzheimer’s disease by stimulating mental activity, decreasing feelings of being alone, easing agitation and creating positive interactions

studies have shown that cognition and mood among people with Alzheimer’s disease improved within four to six weeks after beginning reminiscence therapy

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One in Seven Older Adults Has Dementia


Approximately one in seven, or 3.4 million, Americans age 71 and older has dementia, and 2.4 million have Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new analysis supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). It is the latest in a series of analyses attempting to assess the prevalence of dementia and Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia.


One in Seven Older Adults Has Dementia

Approximately one in seven, or 3.4 million, Americans age 71 and older has dementia, and 2.4 million have Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new analysis supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). It is the latest in a series of analyses attempting to assess the prevalence of dementia and Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia.

The study is the first to estimate rates of dementia and Alzheimer’s using a nationally representative sample of older adults across the United States.

Brenda Plassman, PhD, of Duke University Medical Center, in Durham, NC, worked with Kenneth Langa, MD, PhD, and David Weir, PhD, of the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor; Robert Wallace, PhD, of the University of Iowa, in Iowa City; and others to conduct the analysis as part of the Aging, Demographics and Memory Study, which is a substudy of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS).

HRS is the leading resource for data on the combined health and economic circumstances of Americans over age 50. The substudy and HRS are sponsored by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) under a cooperative agreement with the University of Michigan.

The study highlights the nationwide reach of dementia, which affects not only those with the disease but their families and communities as well.

“As the population ages during the next few decades, the prevalence of Alzheimer’s will increase several-fold unless effective interventions are discovered and implemented,” said NIA director Richard Hodes, MD. “These data underscore the urgency of research in this area.”

The study included 856 HRS participants age 71 and older from 42 states in 2001-2003. Duke researchers conducted home evaluations to gather information about each participant’s cognitive and functional status and symptoms, neuropsychiatric symptoms, medications, medical history, and family history of memory problems. Prior neuroimaging and laboratory results also were obtained.

A team of clinicians reviewed the evaluation information and made a preliminary assessment of cognitive status. A consensus panel of medical experts used diagnostic criteria to determine if the participant had normal cognitive function, cognitive impairment without dementia, or dementia. The criteria also were used to discern the type of dementia, such as Alzheimer’s or vascular dementia, the second most common cause of dementia in older adults.

Based on the experts’ classifications, the researchers estimated the national prevalence and total numbers of people age 71 and older, by age group, with any dementia and with Alzheimer’s or vascular dementia. They determined that 13.9 percent of Americans age 71 and older have some type of dementia, 9.7 percent of people in that age group have Alzheimer’s, and 2.4 percent have vascular dementia. Alzheimer’s accounted for about 70 percent of all dementia cases among people 71 and older.

The substudy analysis showed that the prevalence of dementia increases significantly with age: 5 percent for ages 71-79, 24.2 percent for ages 80-89, and 37.4 percent for 90 or older. The estimated rate of Alzheimer’s also rose greatly with older age, from 2.3 percent for ages 71-79 to 18.1 percent for ages 80 to 89 and 29.7 percent for age 90 and older.

Fewer years of education and the presence of at least one APOE e4 allele, a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s, were found to be strong predictors of dementia.

The substudy data will be valuable in assessing the impact of dementia, said Richard Suzman, PhD, director of the NIA Behavioral and Social Research Program, which jointly directs the HRS. The information about the health, economic and family resources of individuals in the study “will help us to characterize more fully the burden of dementia on individuals, caregivers and the nation’s health care system.”

Previous studies included lower age ranges than the substudy, broader characterizations of dementia, or participants in a specific community as a base for national extrapolations. A 1998 study combined data from four community-based studies, estimating that the national prevalence of Alzheimer’s in individuals age 60 or older would rise from 2.3 million in 1997 to 8.6 million in 2047.2 Widely cited estimates based on the prevalence of Alzheimer’s in a Chicago-based community and an earlier comparable study using data from East Boston forecast the number of those age 65 or older with Alzheimer’s to be 5.1 million in 2010.3,4

References

1.Plassman, B.L., et al. (2007). Prevalence of dementia in the United States: The Aging, Demographics and Memory Study. Neuroepidemiology, 29: 125-32.

2.Brookmeyer, R., et al. (1998). Projections of Alzheimer’s disease in the United States and the public health impact of delaying disease onset. American Journal of Public Health, 88: 1337-42.

3.Hebert, L.E., et al. (2003). Alzheimer disease in the U.S. population. Archives of Neurology, 60: 1119-22.

4.Evans, D.A., et al. (1990). Estimated prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease in the United States. Milbank Quarterly, 68: 267-89.

 
 
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