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Category Archives: early signs of alzheimer’s

See the Signs of Alzheimer’s– Free Guide Available

This free guide is an excellent resource and should be especially interesting to baby boomers. The guide includes: information about Alzheimer’s disease, information about a prescription treatment option, a doctor discussion guide, and caregiving tips.

While you are on the website obtaining this free resource guide you can also select an option that allows a caregiving nurse to call you and discuss Alzheimer’s topics. The nurse can help you identify issues to discuss with your doctor, answer questions about Alzheimer’s, and provide you with important tips and resources in your area.

To obtain this free material go to See The Signs.

You can also visit these interesting areas while you are on the website.

Signs & Symptoms

Symptom Screener

Original content the Alzheimer’s Reading Room

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Early Alzheimer’s patients speak up for others

“It’s labeled incurable and you end up being a vegetable. People think as soon as you’re labeled that way, you are. A lot of us aren’t,” says Hayen, 74, a retired San Diego physician who joined about 30 other early-stage Alzheimer’s patients last month for a lobbying blitz at the nation’s capital.

Follow the link in the clip below to read this interesting story.

clipped from www.msnbc.msn.com

Don Hayen has a handy way of deflecting the instant pity that comes when he reveals his Alzheimer’s disease: “But I haven’t lost my keys all day,” he quickly jokes.

Hayen is part of a growing new movement in Alzheimer’s: Patients diagnosed early enough to still be articulate and demand better care and better research. They are giving a voice to a disease whose victims until now have remained largely silent, and powerless.

It is a shift with big ramifications.

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New Book and Review: The Alzheimer’s Action Plan

“Most of us will either get Alzheimer’s or care for a loved one who has”


Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for The Alzheimer’s Action Plan:
“Evidence-based content, conversational writing, and a good dose of humor make this an outstanding addition to collections on aging and caregiving and an excellent companion to Nancy L. Mace and Peter V. Rabins’s The 36-Hour Day. Highly recommended.”
–Library Journal

“Dr. Doraiswamy has done a masterful job of communicating what the layman should know on the treatment, the care giving and, most important, the prevention of Alzheimer’s. It was gratifying to learn about the mountain of evidence that what is good for your heart is also good for your brain.”
–Arthur Agatston, M.D., cardiologist and #1 New York Times bestselling author of The South Beach Diet

“Memory does matter. Adults across the life cycle are asking questions, many questions! The authors answer these questions for the educated public, family members who encounter memory loss in a loved one, and even adults who believe they are experiencing early memory loss. The answers are comprehensive and understandable, no small accomplishment given the plethora of new information available—information that at times is not only confusing but also conflicting.”
–Dan G. Blazer, M.D., Ph.D., former Dean of Medical Education, Duke University School of Medicine; past President of the American Geriatrics Society

“If you and your family face the specter of Alzheimer’s disease, run – don’t walk – to get Lisa Gwyther’s help. She combines many years of experience with empathy and respect for the patient. That results in the most sensible, compassionate, and practical advice….She is my hero.”
–Naomi S. Boak, Executive Producer, Emmy Award-winning PBS special, “The Forgetting: A Portrait of Alzheimer’s”

“This book is the most comprehensive and up-to-date guide for the diagnosis and management of Alzheimer’s disease. Whether you are a health care professional or have Alzheimer’s in your family or are simply interested to living to an old age, this book is a must read.”
–Deepak Chopra, M.D., New York Times bestselling author of Perfect Health: The Complete Mind/Body Guide

“I love this book! A powerful and vital resource for people who need it the most. Dr. Doraiswamy is that unique blend of medical expertise mixed in with warmth and compassion topped off with humility that makes him rare and wonderful.”
–Leeza Gibbons, Emmy award-winning TV host and founder of Leeza’s Place and the Memory Foundation

“Lisa Gwyther is a national treasure. She has been a pioneer in providing innovative care and education for Alzheimer’s patients and their families for many years. Lisa’s long experience helping families cope with the challenges of memory loss and Alzheimer’s disease makes her uniquely qualified to co-author this book. Families experiencing the new world of memory loss and Alzheimer’s couldn’t ask for a better companion for the journey. Her warmth, compassion, and wisdom shine through, and will help light the way.”
–Pat Lynch, Director of Communications, Alzheimer’s Center Program, National Institute on Aging

“The Alzheimer’s Action Plan provides a clear and compelling message that there is something we can all do about Alzheimer’s disease. The book presents accurate, up-to-date information and step-by-step recommendations that people with the disease, their families, and friends can use now to reduce the potentially devastating effects of Alzheimer’s disease.”
–Katie Maslow, M.S.W., Associate Director of Quality Care Advocacy for the Alzheimer’s Association and winner of the 2003 ASA Award from the American Society on Aging

“Most of us will either get Alzheimer’s or care for a loved one who has. This action plan can empower you to make a difference.”
–Mehmet C. Oz, M.D., co-author of the #1 New York Times bestseller, You: The Owner’s Manual

“A readable, informative, and thorough guide to the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. I highly recommend it.”
–Peter Rabins, M.D., co-author of The 36-Hour Day: A Family Guide to Caring For Persons with Alzheimer Disease, Related Dementing Illnesses, and Memory Loss in Later Life
“Dr. Murali Doraiswamy, one of America’s top memory and Alzheimer’s specialists, has packed this book with expert advice and compassionate wisdom, creating an indispensable guide for anyone concerned about their own memory or that of a loved one. Both accessible and comprehensive, this is a must-read not just for families, but for their doctors as well.”
–Gary Small, M.D., Director, UCLA Center on Aging, and author of The Memory Bible and The Longevity Bible

“The authors speak authoritatively, providing sound evidence for the points they make that is based on current understanding of Alzheimer’s disease, but the language they use and the tone of the book will make their advice and guidelines for Alzheimer’s care and treatment readily accessible to the public….Bravo on a job so well done!”
–John Q. Trojanowski, M.D., Ph.D., William Maul Measey-Truman G. Schnabel, Jr., M.D. Professor of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology, Center Co-Director and Director, Institute on Aging, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center

Product Description

Is it really Alzheimer’s? How to find out and intervene early to maintain the highest quality of life

“Most of us will either get Alzheimer’s or care for a loved one who has. This action plan can empower you to make a difference.”—Mehmet C. Oz, M.D.

What would you do if your mother was having memory problems?

Five million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease, with a new diagnosis being made every seventy-two seconds. Millions more are worried or at risk due to mild memory loss or family history. Although experts agree that early diagnosis and treatment are essential, many people with memory loss and their families—and even their doctors—don’t know where to turn for authoritative, state-of-the-art advice and answers to all of their questions.

Now, combining the insights of a world-class physician and an award-winning social worker, this groundbreaking book tells you everything you need to know, including:

· The best tests to determine if this is—or is not—Alzheimer’s disease

· The most (and least) effective medical treatments

· Coping with behavioral and emotional changes through the early and middle stages

· Gaining access to the latest clinical trials

· Understanding the future of Alzheimer’s

Clear, compassionate, and empowering, The Alzheimer’s Action Plan is the first book that anyone dealing with mild memory loss or early Alzheimer’s must-read in order to preserve the highest possible quality of life for as long as possible.

 

Mild Alzheimer’s Patients Show Rapid Decline In Financial Skills Over One Year

I was late in discovering my mother was suffering from Alzheimer’s dementia. After my father passed away my mother took over the the bill paying. She did this without a problem for over ten years. I finally discovered that there were all kinds of problems. Looking back I realized that this is one of the early signs of dementia. My advice to all is to allow the elderly to pay their own bills and to monitor these payments. If the pattern changes this could be an early tip-off that things are changing and that you need to rule out or rule in the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. This is one of the early signs of Alzheimer’s and dementia.

Mild Alzheimer’s Patients Show Rapid Decline In Financial Skills Over One Year

New research from UAB (University of Alabama at Birmingham) shows that patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have a dramatic decline in their ability to make financial decisions over a one year period. The findings, published Feb. 8 online in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, have strong implications for caregivers and health care providers in the areas of estate planning and fraud prevention.

The UAB team compared 55 patients with mild AD against 63 healthy older adults and followed them for one year. At the beginning of the trial, the mild AD group already showed a 20 percent decline in overall financial ability compared to the control group. By the end of the year, the AD group had dropped another 10 percent.

“After just one year, the mild AD group had dropped to 70 percent of the financial capacity demonstrated by the healthy older adult group, a significant decline,” said Daniel Marson, J.D., Ph.D., director of the UAB Alzheimer’s Disease Center in the Department of Neurology and the study’s lead author.

Patients were assessed on a variety of financial skills, including basic monetary skills, checkbook management, bill payment and understanding a bank statement. Tasks varied from simple ones such as identifying specific coins and currency to complex ones such as preparing bills, checks and envelopes for mailing.

Assessments were done using the Financial Capacity Instrument, (FCI-9), an instrument developed by Marson’s group. The FCI-9 measures 18 different financial tasks within nine domains and has two overall scores.

The AD group showed substantial declines in overall financial capacity, on eight of the nine financial domains and on 12 of the 18 financial tasks. Of particular concern was decline in the ability to recognize telephone or mail fraud.

“Elder fraud is a serious problem and our findings suggest that even patients with mild Alzheimer’s are at significantly increased risk for becoming victims of fraud,” said Marson.

Overall the study found that impairment in financial skills occurs early in AD and progresses relatively rapidly over time, and includes declines in basic judgment and monetary calculation skills. The findings underscore the importance, at the time of diagnosis, of patients with mild AD and their families promptly pursuing financial planning and transfer of financial responsibilities, Marson said.

Proactive steps by families include finalizing trust and estate arrangements, delegating financial decision-making powers, planning for eventual financial incapacity, and providing increased supervision of existing financial activities.

This research was supported by grants from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

University of Alabama at Birmingham
701 20th St. S., AB 1320
Birmingham, AL 35294-0113
United States
http://www.uab.edu

Article URL: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/96795.php

 

Reversing Symptoms of Alzheimer’s?

Might be a breakthrough. We can only hope.

clipped from www.foxnews.com

A patient with Alzheimer’s disease had their condition improve hugely just minutes after receiving a special injection of a prescription drug approved to treat psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis and other conditions, according to a new study.

The drug, co-marketed in the U.S. by Amgen and Wyeth under the name Enbrel, dramatically reversed symptoms of an Alzheimer’s disease sufferer minutes after it was injected into the patient’s spine, researchers in the U.S. discovered. The drug, sold in Australia as Etanercept, has also been used off-label for treating Alzheimer’s.

an “exciting” breakthrough, which provided a greater understanding of the disease. “It is unprecedented that we can see cognitive and behavioral improvement in a patient with established dementia within minutes of therapeutic intervention,” Griffin said.

this report details rapid cognitive improvement, beginning within minutes, using this same… treatment modality, in a patient with late-onset Alzheimer’s disease.”

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Arthritis Drug Shows Promise in Reversing Symptoms of Alzheimer’s

A patient with Alzheimer’s disease had their condition improve hugely just minutes after receiving a special injection of a prescription drug approved to treat psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis and other conditions, according to a new study.

The drug, co-marketed in the U.S. by Amgen and Wyeth under the name Enbrel, dramatically reversed symptoms of an Alzheimer’s disease sufferer minutes after it was injected into the patient’s spine, researchers in the U.S. discovered. The drug, sold in Australia as Etanercept, has also been used off-label for treating Alzheimer’s.

A report on the new study appeared in the Journal of Neuroinflammation this week.

Click here for the full study

Journal editor Professor Sue Griffin from the University of Arkansas said the study was an “exciting” breakthrough, which provided a greater understanding of the disease. “It is unprecedented that we can see cognitive and behavioral improvement in a patient with established dementia within minutes of therapeutic intervention,” Griffin said.

“This gives all of us in Alzheimer’s research a tremendous new clue about new avenues of research, which is so exciting and so needed in the field of Alzheimer’s.

“Even though this report predominantly discusses a single patient, it is of significant scientific interest because of the potential insight it may give into the processes involved in the brain dysfunction of Alzheimer’s.”

Professor Edward Tobinick from the University of California and Professor Hyman Gross from the University of Southern California made the discovery while treating a patient who developed Alzheimer’s disease later in life.

“The efficacy of (Enbrel) … delivered by perispinal administration, for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease over a period of six months has been previously reported in a pilot study,” the researchers said.

“(But) this report details rapid cognitive improvement, beginning within minutes, using this same… treatment modality, in a patient with late-onset Alzheimer’s disease.”

 

Blood Test May Predict Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s experts are optimistic that a new type of blood test could one day allow doctors to accurately predict one’s risk of developing the degenerative disease.

While prior research has suggested that imaging techniques and tests on spinal fluid could also be used to predict the risk of Alzheimer’s, a study in published in the current issue of the journal Nature Medicine suggests that this goal could be accomplished with a simple blood draw.

Such a test, if proven effective, would be less costly than imaging techniques and less invasive than a spinal tap.

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Stanford scientists find blood test to ID Alzheimer’s


This is an important development for those genetically predisposed to Alzheimer’s.

NEW YORK, Oct. 14 (UPI) — Researchers Sunday reported progress on development of a blood test that can diagnose Alzheimer’s disease, perhaps years before memory loss sets in.

The researchers, mainly based at California’s Stanford University, said the test was about 90 percent accurate in distinguishing the blood of people with Alzheimer’s from the blood of others, The New York Times reported. The scientists said the test was about 80 percent accurate in determining which patients with mild memory loss would go on to develop Alzheimer’s disease during the next two to six years.

The results were published online in the journal Nature Medicine.

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